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Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Wednesday, 09 April 2008 10:24

Microsoft shows trade secrets

Written by Nick Farell

Image

Application Protocol freed


Software
giant Microsoft has got around to releasing information it once considered so secret, you would have to be killed if you ever knew it and left the company.

More than 14,000 pages Application protocol documentation for Microsoft Office 2007, SharePoint Server 2007 and Exchange Server 2007 have been posted at MSDN, a Web site for developers.

The protocols reveal how Exchange Server can communicate with Outlook and those used by Office and SharePoint to communicate with one another and other Microsoft server products. Tom Robertson, Microsoft's General Manager of Interoperability and Standards, said in a statement that it was a bold step toward putting interoperability principles into action.

The move is being spun as a move by Microsoft to become more "open." In separate anti-trust cases, the United States and European Union had long sought for Microsoft to release protocol documents, but trends like Linux and Web 2.0 are increasingly forcing Microsoft's hand.
Last modified on Wednesday, 09 April 2008 18:45

Nick Farell

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