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Friday, 20 April 2012 10:48

Apple's next iPhone comes with a terminator

Written by Nick Farrell



Looks for Sarah Connor, drops yours calls


Already in hot water in legions of countries for lying to users about the ability for the iPad to run on 4G, Apple now appears to be trying to convince people that the next iPhone will have a terminator on board.

Korea IT News reported that the iPhone 5 is likely to be housed in Liquidmetal, the commercial name for an alloy of titanium, zirconium, nickel, copper and other metals. It would make the outer surface of the phone “smooth like liquid.”

Most people associate Liquidmetal with the Terminator and assume it can turn into any shape. Unless you drop it in molten metal it will just reform itself. However it is really just  metallic glass which is strong and has high wear resistance against scratching and denting, and a good strength-to-weight ratio. 

But it can be  fabricated similar to plastic injection molding, but with similar properties to metal. Apple was granted rights to use it in August of 2010 and it used Liquidmetal for its SIM card ejector tool  which was under the bonnet of first-generation iPads.  Making a whole case of one would be very expensive.

Nick Farrell

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