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Thursday, 10 April 2008 11:32

BBC and ISPs row over iPlayer

Written by Nick Farell

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Stop breaking the Internet


ISPs are complaining that the BBC's iPlayer is choking up their networks with large video content and they want the television company to pay to upgrade their lines.

ISPs say the on-demand TV service is putting a strain on their networks, which need to be upgraded to cope. In its first three months more than 42m programs have been accessed using the video on demand service. Watchdog Ofcom thinks that will cost ISPs in the region of £830m to pay for the extra capacity needed to allow for services like the iPlayer.

Simon Gunter, from ISP Tiscali, has been quoted as saying that the BBC should stump up a bit of cash to solve the problem. Ashley Highfield, head of future media and technology at the corporation, has said he believes the cost of network upgrades should be carried by ISPs. Some ISPs have threatened to throttle the service so that users cannot download that much from the service.

Analysts say that the reason that ISPs are in trouble is because they have priced themselves on the assumption that people would only use the connection for email.

More here.
Last modified on Thursday, 10 April 2008 15:54

Nick Farell

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