Featured Articles

Nvidia officially launches the 8-inch Shield Tablet

Nvidia officially launches the 8-inch Shield Tablet

As expected and reported earlier, Nvidia has now officially announced its newest Shield device, the new 8-inch Shield Tablet. While the…

More...
Intel launches new mobile Haswell and Bay Trail parts

Intel launches new mobile Haswell and Bay Trail parts

Intel has introduced seven new Haswell mobile parts and four Bay Trail SoC chips, but most of them are merely clock…

More...
Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool is well known for its gamer cases with aggressive styling. However, the Dead Silence chassis offers consumers a new choice,…

More...
AMD SVP John Byrne named turnaround exec of the year

AMD SVP John Byrne named turnaround exec of the year

Director of AMD’s PR Chris Hook has tweeted and confirmed later in a conversation with Fudzilla that John Byrne, Senior Vice…

More...
AMD A8-7600 Kaveri APU reviewed

AMD A8-7600 Kaveri APU reviewed

Today we'll take a closer look at AMD's A8-7600 APU Kaveri APU, more specifically we'll examine the GPU performance you can…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Tuesday, 01 May 2012 10:40

Connected TV's are disconnected

Written by Nick Farrell



Bought but not “used”


Most people in Britain with a connected TV actually lead a very disconnected TV existence, according to a new survey.

Kantar Media’s futurePROOF study of consumer take up and usage of digital devices and media said that only 17 per cent of Brits are buying connected TVs and of those that do only 7 per cent plug it in. Those who buy connected TVs are largely focused on things like  screen size and picture quality, rather than connectivity. More than one in three adults simply do not see the point of accessing the internet through a TV set.

Part of the problem is a lack of comprehensive content.  There is also a general lack of awareness of the services that are available and the advantages of accessing them via a main TV set. For users of connected TV, functionality, having to use the remote as a web input device, the absence of some major broadcasters and the loading time of apps are all common complaints.

The big irritation of ‘buffering’ when trying to watch a show through the broadband connection that causes greatest disillusionment for connected TV users. Most of those who do use it, use things like YouTube content and apps such as Skype, which can bring distant loved ones into the living room to be seen by the whole family.

Trevor Vagg, Director, Kantar Media Custom, comments:  “Our qualitative research identified a clear desire in connected TV households to make fuller use of the technology. However, it looks like development of connected TV will be more evolution than revolution with content availability, functionality and broadband speeds presenting significant obstacles to greater usage.”

Nick Farrell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments