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Tuesday, 01 May 2012 10:40

Connected TV's are disconnected

Written by Nick Farrell



Bought but not “used”


Most people in Britain with a connected TV actually lead a very disconnected TV existence, according to a new survey.

Kantar Media’s futurePROOF study of consumer take up and usage of digital devices and media said that only 17 per cent of Brits are buying connected TVs and of those that do only 7 per cent plug it in. Those who buy connected TVs are largely focused on things like  screen size and picture quality, rather than connectivity. More than one in three adults simply do not see the point of accessing the internet through a TV set.

Part of the problem is a lack of comprehensive content.  There is also a general lack of awareness of the services that are available and the advantages of accessing them via a main TV set. For users of connected TV, functionality, having to use the remote as a web input device, the absence of some major broadcasters and the loading time of apps are all common complaints.

The big irritation of ‘buffering’ when trying to watch a show through the broadband connection that causes greatest disillusionment for connected TV users. Most of those who do use it, use things like YouTube content and apps such as Skype, which can bring distant loved ones into the living room to be seen by the whole family.

Trevor Vagg, Director, Kantar Media Custom, comments:  “Our qualitative research identified a clear desire in connected TV households to make fuller use of the technology. However, it looks like development of connected TV will be more evolution than revolution with content availability, functionality and broadband speeds presenting significant obstacles to greater usage.”

Nick Farrell

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