Featured Articles

Intel releases tiny 3G cell modem

Intel releases tiny 3G cell modem

Intel has released a 3G cellular modem with an integrated power amplifier that fits into a 300 mm2 footprint, claiming it…

More...
Braswell 14nm Atom slips to Q2 15

Braswell 14nm Atom slips to Q2 15

It's not all rosy in the house of Intel. It seems that upcoming Atom out-of-order cores might be giving this semiconductor…

More...
TSMC 16nm wafers coming in Q1 2015

TSMC 16nm wafers coming in Q1 2015

TSMC will start producing 16nm wafers in the first quarter of 2015. Sometime in the second quarter production should ramp up…

More...
Skylake-S LGA is 35W to 95W TDP part

Skylake-S LGA is 35W to 95W TDP part

Skylake-S is the ‘tock’ of the Haswell architecture and despite being delayed from the original plan, this desktop part is scheduled…

More...
Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool is well known for its gamer cases with aggressive styling. However, the Dead Silence chassis offers consumers a new choice,…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Tuesday, 15 May 2012 11:18

Adobe releases Muse

Written by Nick Farrell



Web designers don't need to code


Adobe has released new software that means Web designers can create websites without writing code. Muse has been available as a public beta and simplifies planning, designing and publishing original HTML pages similar to creating layouts for print. The software gives you master pages, built-in tools for interactivity, and offers access to more than 400 Web fonts through the Adobe Typekit.

It is available a standalone subscription or as part of Adobe Creative Cloud membership. Adobe said that it will help web designers add engaging, interactive elements such as slide shows and embed content from sources such as Google Maps and Facebook. Developers can preview and test functionality of a website within Adobe Muse or create a temporary site and share the URL with clients for review.

When the site is ready to go live, designers can either host it using a third-party application or use Adobe's hosting service. Adobe Digital Media Business senior vice president David Wadhwani said, "Adobe Muse gives designers the freedom to build sites without having to learn code, which will help them expand their businesses and offer their clients more cost effective, professional websites."

Nick Farrell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments