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Wednesday, 13 June 2012 14:37

Facebook forced to reveal cyberbullies' names

Written by Nick Farrell

facebook

British court wades in

A top British court has told Facebook that it will have to reveal the identity of those who sent a Brighton woman abusive messages about a post on The X Factor's Frankie Cocozza. It is the first case where an individual has successfully taken legal action against Facebook to reveal the identities of cyberbullies.

Nicola Brookes was granted a high court order after receiving "vicious and depraved" abuse on Facebook. She posted a comment in support of the former The X Factor contestant Frankie Cocozza, who was falsely branded a paedophile and drug dealer by anonymous Facebook users who set up a fake profile page on the website.

She wanted to bring a private prosecution against at least four alleged internet trolls, but was stopped by Facebook. Now Facebook must now reveal the names, emails and IP addresses of those behind the abusive messages, showing who they are and where they posted from.

Facebook has not yet received the court order but has said it will comply when it does. The order was given backing at the high court on 30 May and must now be physically served on Facebook in the US, where the social network is based.

Cocozza was a young singer who was evicted from X Factor last year. Apparently it mattered to people.


Nick Farrell

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