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Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Sunday, 25 February 2007 22:33

Blue lasers breakthrough 10x threshold

Written by Fuad Abazovic
nichia



Japanese job


Japanese
company called Nichia has managed to design a new blue blue-violet laser that can fill up a 54GB double-layer disc at more than 10X speed.Currently most blue lasers can only manage ranges of between 2-4X and take about 50 minutes to transcribe a full DVD movie. A 10X speed will mean that DVDs can be made within 10 minutes.

The key to the faster speed is the power of the laser. Nichia’s new blue-violet semiconductor laser diodes uses 320 mW (milliwatts), while the average consumer grade blue laser devices commercially available today are in the range of 20mW.

The more power you have, the faster it will spin the disk to burn the data.  The extra power means that a 10X laser disc recorder can achieve a writing velocity of 44.9 Mbps where as the current Blu-ray burner can manage 8.99 Mbps.

More can be read at Daily Tech, here.
[http://www.dailytech.com/article.aspx?newsid=6202]

Last modified on Tuesday, 27 February 2007 12:48

Fuad Abazovic

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