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Thursday, 26 July 2012 16:12

Study says Wii playing kids have superior motor skills

Written by Nedim Hadzic

wii

Not sure why though


A recent
pilot study by Aussie researchers revealed that pre-school kids who play interactive video games have superior motor skills when compared to their non-playing friends.

Conducted by Deakin University and the University of Wollongong, the study involved 53 pre-schoolers aged from 3 to 6, of which more than half were girls. It aimed to find a link between basic movement skills and playing interactive games.

The study revealed that the children who played interactive games had superior object control skills, i.e. in kicking, catching, rolling and throwing balls. The study found no link of that kind of gaming affecting locomotor skills, such as hopping, jumping and running.

Lead researcher Dr. Lisa Barnett was reluctant to jump to conclusions though and said that we cannot be certain why this is so. She conceded that while children may have developed these skills in games, it is also possible that children with superior motor skills are simply drawn to such games more than their non-playing friends.

Some would say that practicing has been a successful method for making children and adults better at what they are doing, but we understand Dr. Barnett's wish to refrain from rash conclusions.

More here, via vr-zone.


Last modified on Friday, 27 July 2012 08:31
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