Featured Articles

AMD Never Settle Forever bundle hits 200-series cards

AMD Never Settle Forever bundle hits 200-series cards

AMD’s Never Settle bundles have been around for a while and the community response has been extremely positive. When AMD launched…

More...
AMD shipping Beema APUs

AMD shipping Beema APUs

According to Lisa Su, SVP & GM, Global Business Units at AMD, Beema notebook parts have started shipping to manufacturers last…

More...
IHS teardown reveals Galaxy S5 BOM

IHS teardown reveals Galaxy S5 BOM

Research firm IHS got hold of Samsung’s new flagship smartphone and took it apart to the last bolt to figure out…

More...
Galaxy S5, HTC One M8 available selling well

Galaxy S5, HTC One M8 available selling well

Samsung’s Galaxy S5 has finally gone on sale and it can be yours for €699, which is quite a lot of…

More...
KFA2 GTX 780 Ti Hall Of Fame reviewed

KFA2 GTX 780 Ti Hall Of Fame reviewed

KFA2 gained a lot of overclocking experience with the GTX 780 Hall of Fame (HOF), which we had a chance to…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Friday, 10 August 2012 09:22

Haswell to be 10+ percent faster than Ivy Bridge

Written by Fuad Abazovic



More overclocking headroom, too


Intel internally calls Haswell its “fourth generation” Core processor micro architecture, and we believe that Intel counts only major steps in its development.

Its first Core architecture was called Conroe /Merom in 65nm, followed by Nehalem in 45nm, Sandy Bridge in 32nm and Haswell will be the second 22nm core with a new architecture.

Intel still plays its old tick-tock game and Haswell is a major step, or a tock, while Broadwell is 14nm shrunk version of the Haswell architecture. A more obvious example is Sandy Bridge in 32nm, a tock in Intel’s development cycle, while the most recent Core processor is a tick, and it is based on 22nm Ivy Bridge core.

Now Intel tells its partners to expect that Haswell should end up at least 10 percent faster than Ivy Bridge based cores at the same clock.  These numbers are based on pre-silicon projections that Intel always does before it gets the working prototype back, but since we are some month away from the IDF 2012 in San Francisco, we are quite sure that we will see Haswell again, much closer to its final design, and we even expect to see Broadwell prototypes to hit at least one of the keynotes.

Intel also hints at enhanced based overclocking and end user tunability, which sounds promising to many enthusiasts. If all goes well for Intel, Haswell should be quite a nice piece of hardware once it ships in Q2 2013.

Last modified on Friday, 10 August 2012 09:42
blog comments powered by Disqus

To be able to post comments please log-in with Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments