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Wednesday, 05 September 2012 09:39

FBI denies Apple laptop hacked

Written by Nick Farrell



Apple ID numbers safe

The FBI claims there was "no evidence" to support claims that hacking group Anonymous infiltrated an FBI agent's laptop and lifted a file with identification numbers for more than 12 million Apple products.

Anonymous affiliate "AntiSec" posted a file on the Internet on Monday that it said contained more than 1 million of the Apple numbers. The hackers claimed it had nicked them from an FBI agent's laptop in March. However the FBI said that there was no evidence indicating that an FBI laptop was compromised or that the FBI either sought or obtained this data.

But the hackers got the information from somewhere. The Apple numbers UDIDs, are a sequence of letters and numbers assigned to Apple products. Many web-based mobile applications and gaming networks use UDIDs to identify users. AntiSec said it removed personal data associated with the UDIDs, such as consumers' names and telephone numbers.

It was fairly specific about where it got the data. It said that it had breached FBI agent Christopher Stangl's PC by exploiting a flaw in the computer's Java software. The group said it downloaded a list from Stangl's computer that was found to contain UDIDs for 12,367,232 Apple devices. Stangl exists and has made no statement on the matter.

Nick Farrell

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