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Tuesday, 23 October 2012 10:24

Businesses are going to be slow on Windows 8 takeup

Written by Nick Farrell

windows logo new

Some are still sticking to XP

It seems that Reuters is getting ready for Windows 8 to be a big turkey by dusting off an old yarn about how the OS will fail because businesses are not going to be early adopters.

“There was once a time when the launch of a new Windows operating system was a huge deal for the technology departments in many businesses. Not anymore. Microsoft Corp's release of Windows 8 on Friday is likely to be a non-event for most companies -- and some experts say many may never adopt it,”  a Reuters hack tapped onto his iMac. They have a point, businesses will be slow to adopt Windows 8 and a large chunk of them will stick to Windows XP until you prise it from their cold dead hands.

But that is what always happens. Corporates are rarely bleeding edge adopters of any operating system. It does not mean that Windows 8 is going to be a turkey, it might well be Microsoft's next Vista, but you are not going to tell by looking at corporate adoption.

A corporate who rolls out a new operating system before it has bedded in is asking for a shedload of headaches it does not need. Windows 7 is stable enough for most businesses and those who do upgrade from XP do have a place to go. Where Reuters gets things right however is that Microsoft it its bid to push into the consumer market might have left out businesses from their equation all together.

Doug Johnson, head of risk management policy at the American Bankers Association, whose members are among the world's biggest technology buyers is quoted as saying that Windows 8 is more of a consumer platform than it is a business platform, so it's not something that makes any sense from a business perspective.


Nick Farrell

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