Featured Articles

Nvidia Shield 2 shows up in AnTuTu

Nvidia Shield 2 shows up in AnTuTu

Nvidia’s original Shield console launched last summer to mixed reviews. It went on sale in the US and so far Nvidia…

More...
AMD CSO John Byrne talks ARM

AMD CSO John Byrne talks ARM

We had a chance to talk about AMD’s upcoming products with John Byrne, Chief Sales Officer, AMD. We covered a number…

More...
AMD Chief Sales Officer thinks GPU leadership is critical

AMD Chief Sales Officer thinks GPU leadership is critical

We had a chance to talk to John Byrne who spent the last two years as Senior Vice President and Chief…

More...
OpenPlus One $299 5.5-inch Full HD phone

OpenPlus One $299 5.5-inch Full HD phone

OnePlus is one of the few small companies that might disrupt the Android phone market, dominated by giant outfits like Samsung.…

More...
KFA2 GTX 780 Ti Hall Of Fame reviewed

KFA2 GTX 780 Ti Hall Of Fame reviewed

KFA2 gained a lot of overclocking experience with the GTX 780 Hall of Fame (HOF), which we had a chance to…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Monday, 29 October 2012 12:10

Windows 8 will not save the DRAM industry

Written by Nick Farrell



iSuppli predicts more doom


Microsoft's rollout of Windows 8 is not expected to generate a significant increase in DRAM shipments, according to market research firm IHS iSuppli.

Other operating system roll outs have pushed up the demand for DRAM, and some had hoped that it would save the battered industy. However while iSuppli thinks that Global DRAM bit shipments are expected to increase by eight percent in the fourth quarter compared to the third quarter, this is much lower than previous Windows roll outs.

In the good old days  Windows rollouts have always generated double-digit increases in quarterly DRAM shipments. Part of the problem is that Windows 8 is pretty good software and has a leaner hardware requirement. But the biggest part is that Windows 8 is not likely to deliver a significant increase in PC shipments in the fourth quarter compared to the fourth quarter of 2011, IHS said.

Clifford Leimbach, analyst for memory demand forecasting at IHS said that starting with Windows 7 and continuing with Windows 8, Microsoft has taken a leaner approach with its operating systems, maintaining the same DRAM requirements as before.
Customers are continuing to shun new PC purchases, and Windows 8 is not expected to change the equation. IHS recently forecast that overall PC shipments would contract in 2012 for the first time in 11 years.

Nick Farrell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

To be able to post comments please log-in with Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments