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Friday, 30 November 2012 09:37

ISPs delay file-sharing hunt

Written by Nick Farrell



Blaming the weather

US ISPs are blaming the weather for the reason why they are not helping Big Content track down file-sharers. The ISPs had reluctantly agreed to take part in the Copyright Alert System, which was supposed to begin by the end of the year.

However the launch of the programme has been held until early 2013 because Hurricane Sandy “seriously affected our final testing schedules. It has taken four years to get the programme up and running. Signed up to it are AT&T, Cablevision Systems, Comcast, Time Warner Cable and Verizon.

After four offenses, it calls for these residential internet providers to initiate so-called “mitigation measuresthat might include reducing internet speeds and redirecting a subscriber’s service to an educational” landing page about infringement. While internet companies may eliminate service altogether for repeat file-sharing offenders, the plan does not directly call for such drastic action.

Big Content will still be allowed to sue internet subscribers who engage in infringing activities. ISPs asked for a delay earlier this year because they feared a backlash after federal anti-piracy proposals — the Stop Online Piracy Act and the Protect IP Act were mothballed amid Internet protests.

Nick Farrell

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