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Monday, 07 January 2013 11:37

USB 3.0 to get a bit faster

Written by Peter Scott



Quite a bit, 10Gbps


USB 3.0 adoption rates are growing steadily, but the “new” standard has been off to a slow start. Intel didn’t support it for years, nor did Apple, but good old AMD did from the start.

Now that USB 3.0 is practically becoming a standard for external storage, thanks to a combination of low cost, high speed and compatibility, there is a chance it could become a bit better.

The Register is reporting that the USB 3.0 spec could be revised this year to increase data throughput. The change would double the USB 3.0 clock rate, resulting in a twofold speed increase. This means next generation USB 3.0 devices should be able to deliver 10 gigabits per second, a far cry from 480 megabits per second on USB 2.0 devices.

What’s more, the new spec will be backwards compatible for the most part. However, existing USB cables won’t be certified to handle the new speeds, although this does not automatically mean that they won’t work. They probably will, sans official certification.

More here.

Last modified on Monday, 07 January 2013 20:43

Peter Scott

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