Featured Articles

IHS teardown reveals Galaxy S5 BOM

IHS teardown reveals Galaxy S5 BOM

Research firm IHS got hold of Samsung’s new flagship smartphone and took it apart to the last bolt to figure out…

More...
Galaxy S5, HTC One M8 available selling well

Galaxy S5, HTC One M8 available selling well

Samsung’s Galaxy S5 has finally gone on sale and it can be yours for €699, which is quite a lot of…

More...
Intel lists Haswell refresh parts

Intel lists Haswell refresh parts

Intel has added a load of Haswell refresh parts to its official price list and there really aren’t any surprises to…

More...
Respawn confirms Titanfall DLC for May

Respawn confirms Titanfall DLC for May

During his appearance at PAX East panel and confirmed on Twitter, Titanfall developer Respawn confirmed that the first DLC pack for…

More...
KFA2 GTX 780 Ti Hall Of Fame reviewed

KFA2 GTX 780 Ti Hall Of Fame reviewed

KFA2 gained a lot of overclocking experience with the GTX 780 Hall of Fame (HOF), which we had a chance to…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Thursday, 10 January 2013 11:11

Anonymous thinks DDoS should be a legitimate form of protest

Written by Peter Scott



Because it’s no different than hitting refresh


Anonymous has posted a rather interesting petition on the White House website, seeking to make DDoS attacks a legal form of protest.

The group claims DDoS attacks are not hacking, but the equivalent of “hitting the refresh button on a webpage.” The petition needs to reach 25,000 signatures in 30 days in order to be reviewed by the White House, which really has nothing better to do this time of year.

Anonymous insists that DDoS are no different than any “occupy” protest. “Instead of a group of people standing outside a building to occupy the area, they are having their computer occupy a website to slow (or deny) service of that particular website for a short time,” claims Anon.

However, this is not entirely true. DDoS attacks are usually carried out by botnets, not actual users visiting websites and hitting the refresh buttons. Also, last time I checked infecting computers with malware and creating your own personal botnet is illegal in practically every country on the planet.

Street protests usually involve thousands of people willing to give up plenty of time and brave the weather and police in riot gear to get their point across. The same can’t be said of DDoS attacks, as they can be launched by a single bloke with a grudge. The real equivalent would be sending out tens of thousands of zombies to wreak havoc on the streets while sipping Jolt Cola in mum’s basement.

More here.

Peter Scott

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

To be able to post comments please log-in with Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments