Featured Articles

AMD sheds light on stacked DRAM APUs

AMD sheds light on stacked DRAM APUs

AMD is fast tracking stacked DRAM deployment and a new presentation leaked by the company  points to APUs with stacked DRAM,…

More...
Nvidia officially launches the 8-inch Shield Tablet

Nvidia officially launches the 8-inch Shield Tablet

As expected and reported earlier, Nvidia has now officially announced its newest Shield device, the new 8-inch Shield Tablet. While the…

More...
Intel launches new mobile Haswell and Bay Trail parts

Intel launches new mobile Haswell and Bay Trail parts

Intel has introduced seven new Haswell mobile parts and four Bay Trail SoC chips, but most of them are merely clock…

More...
Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool is well known for its gamer cases with aggressive styling. However, the Dead Silence chassis offers consumers a new choice,…

More...
AMD A8-7600 Kaveri APU reviewed

AMD A8-7600 Kaveri APU reviewed

Today we'll take a closer look at AMD's A8-7600 APU Kaveri APU, more specifically we'll examine the GPU performance you can…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Wednesday, 16 January 2013 11:50

Google in Donkey killing scandal

Written by Nick Farrell



Did it fall or was it pushed?


The World Wide Wibble is all a flutter after snaps appeared which suggested that the Google Street View car might have killed a donkey.

It all comes from street images shown in Botswana. The Google Maps image shows a puff of dust flying up from the injured donkey, suggesting that the camera must have captured the donkey as it fell rather than just lying on the road. Google sent News.com.au photos which it says prove that the car did not hit the donkey. The Google Street View car approached the donkey as it was taking a nap, and then the donkey gets up and continues walking uninjured.

There are four images. The first has the donkey lying down, in between two prominent tire marks. The next shows the donkey getting up, while the third has the donkey is standing off and to the left, meters behind where it fell. The last shows the donkey even further back on the left. Google claims the photos show the events in the order they occurred.

Roger Short, adjunct professor of zoology at Melbourne University pointed out that all this was impossible. Donkeys are particularly fond of walking forwards, a scenario which requires one to walk backwards is unlikely. Of course if the donkey was hit, chances are the Google car would have been a mess and would have been unlikely to have driven on like nothing happened.

Google-donkey

(Exactly how is this "a street"? Ed)

Last modified on Wednesday, 16 January 2013 11:58

Nick Farrell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments