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Monday, 28 January 2013 11:48

New server can survive parachute landing

Written by Nick Farrell



Now all you could want for Christmas


When you are looking at the server sitting blinking at you in the corner do you ever worry about what happens if you suddenly have to drop it by parachute somewhere? No, us neither, but apparently someone was so worried about this sticky problem that they spend a lot of time and energy making their servers parachute jump proof.

According to NCS Technologies there is a market for servers that can be dropped into a region into crisis areas or war zones if needed. The Bunker XRV-5241 is a 1U rack server designed for organisations such as the military and first responders that need servers in rugged environments. It has been tested by the US military  and can withstand a free-fall drop of around 1 meter, but for parachute deployment it needs to be packaged into the case for additional protection.

The server can withstand temperatures between 0 degrees to 50 degrees Celsius when in operation and between minus 40 degrees to 70 degrees Celsius when not running. It can withstand an altitude of up to 3,048 meters when operational and up to 25,000 feet when it is off. The server can also handle falling off the back of a lorry. (Now all it needs is a new war and a juicy Halliburton/KBR contract. Ed)

Nick Farrell

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