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Thursday, 07 February 2013 11:15

Haswell desktop transition significantly slower

Written by Fuad Abazovic

Compared to Ivy Bridge last year

The production of Ivy Bridge 22nm desktop parts started in the first half of 2012, at a time when Sandy Bridge generation products acquitted for almost 80 percent of Intel’s total desktop CPU shipments.

At that time, Ivy Bridge accounted for less than 5 percent of Intel desktop CPUs, but the transition plans envisioned it quickly growing to more than 30 percent in the second half of 2012.

In the first half of 2013 Intel plans that close to 80 percent of desktop CPUs on the market will be based on Ivy Bridge and Haswell will take less than five percent. To make matters worse. Haswell will take close to 20 percent of desktop market in the second half of 2013, some 30 percent less than with the introduction of Ivy Bridge.

We are sure that Intel wants to push Haswell to as many mobile platforms as it can, but it is intriguing that Intel had to slow down the transition when it comes to its next generation CPUs.

It might be that the transition to a new socket and new chipset are to blame.

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