Featured Articles

Intel releases tiny 3G cell modem

Intel releases tiny 3G cell modem

Intel has released a 3G cellular modem with an integrated power amplifier that fits into a 300 mm2 footprint, claiming it…

More...
Braswell 14nm Atom slips to Q2 15

Braswell 14nm Atom slips to Q2 15

It's not all rosy in the house of Intel. It seems that upcoming Atom out-of-order cores might be giving this semiconductor…

More...
TSMC 16nm wafers coming in Q1 2015

TSMC 16nm wafers coming in Q1 2015

TSMC will start producing 16nm wafers in the first quarter of 2015. Sometime in the second quarter production should ramp up…

More...
Skylake-S LGA is 35W to 95W TDP part

Skylake-S LGA is 35W to 95W TDP part

Skylake-S is the ‘tock’ of the Haswell architecture and despite being delayed from the original plan, this desktop part is scheduled…

More...
Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool is well known for its gamer cases with aggressive styling. However, the Dead Silence chassis offers consumers a new choice,…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Friday, 15 February 2013 11:07

Zombies put fear of god in US

Written by Nick Farrell



Brainless Civil Defense can’t protect themselves

Earlier this week we ran a yarn about how a hacker took out a US television channel’s emergency broadcast story and ran a fake broadcast about Zombies rising from their graves. But a typical hack which was amusing at the time, is being taken as seriously as a terrorist attack by the humourless US.

The problem is not Zombies so much as the fact that the attack showed how pathetic the civil defence IT system was. Security experts said the equipment used by the Emergency Alert System remained vulnerable when stations allow it be accessed via the public internet. What is worrying them is that during a real disaster a foreign power or terror group could use the same attack vector to cause more damage.

Karole White, president of the Michigan Association of Broadcasters said that it was not what the hackers said. It is the fact that they got into the system. They could have caused some real damage. It was believed the hackers were able to get in because TV stations had not changed the default passwords they used when the equipment was first shipped from the manufacturer.

Broadcasters were ordered to change the passwords for the EAS equipment, but Mike Davis, a hardware security expert with IOActive Labs said that would not stop the hackers, who could get past the password protection scheme.
The FCC ordered the telly stations to check systems to ensure that hackers had not queued "unauthorised alerts" for future transmission.

Nick Farrell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments