Featured Articles

IHS teardown reveals Galaxy S5 BOM

IHS teardown reveals Galaxy S5 BOM

Research firm IHS got hold of Samsung’s new flagship smartphone and took it apart to the last bolt to figure out…

More...
Galaxy S5, HTC One M8 available selling well

Galaxy S5, HTC One M8 available selling well

Samsung’s Galaxy S5 has finally gone on sale and it can be yours for €699, which is quite a lot of…

More...
Intel lists Haswell refresh parts

Intel lists Haswell refresh parts

Intel has added a load of Haswell refresh parts to its official price list and there really aren’t any surprises to…

More...
Respawn confirms Titanfall DLC for May

Respawn confirms Titanfall DLC for May

During his appearance at PAX East panel and confirmed on Twitter, Titanfall developer Respawn confirmed that the first DLC pack for…

More...
KFA2 GTX 780 Ti Hall Of Fame reviewed

KFA2 GTX 780 Ti Hall Of Fame reviewed

KFA2 gained a lot of overclocking experience with the GTX 780 Hall of Fame (HOF), which we had a chance to…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Wednesday, 27 February 2013 10:42

Terminator sparrow helps researchers

Written by Nick Farrell



Makes other birds want to kill it

An android bird built from off-the-shelf robotics parts helped US biologists study behaviour in a sparrow species.

Duke University in North Carolina worked with engineering students and a taxidermist to operate the wings of a dead sparrow. Using simple Picaxe computer chips, and built a linear motor to fit inside the cavity of the bird they named Robosparrow. The idea was not to search for a sparrow Sarah Connor, but to study male aggressive behaviour among the species.

Over two months the researchers confirmed that wing-flapping is a sign of male aggression. The robot was programmed to be aggressive flap its wings at other birds. They took umbrage at the robot and beat it up. At no point however did they try to dowse it in liquid nitrogen, but the test was not carried out at iron works either.

Still apparently you can make a robo-sparrow for £990, just don’t expect it to do much other than get beaten up by other birds and kill itself.

Nick Farrell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

To be able to post comments please log-in with Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments