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Thursday, 14 March 2013 12:04

Nintendo nicked 3D technology

Written by Nick Farrell



US court rules against game console maker

A federal jury found that video game company Nintendo infringed an inventor's 3-D display technology patent with its handheld 3DS videogame system. The jury awarded the inventor, Seijiro Tomita, $30.2 million in compensatory damages.

The technology involved provided 3-D images without the need for 3-D glasses. Last month Tomita's attorney, Joe Diamante, told the jury in U.S. District Court in Manhattan that Nintendo used technology that Tomita developed for its 3DS. Tomita worked for Sony.

Nintendo said that 3DS doesn't use key aspects of Tomita's patent and added that a 2003 meeting with Nintendo officials that Tomita cited in his argument was merely one of several the company held with vendors selling 3-D display technology. Lindvall declined to comment following the verdict. Nintendo officials were not immediately available for comment.

Nick Farrell

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