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Thursday, 18 April 2013 07:26

Metro bypass coming in Windows 8.1

Written by David Stellmack

Boot to desktop option planned in update

Microsoft has apparently heard the cries of both business and home users who have not embraced the Metro interface in Windows 8 as the company would have liked. The company is apparently planning to offer a “Boot to desktop” mode, or option that will allow the computer to boot into the traditional Windows desktop, rather than into Metro.

Many PC makers believe that the lack of the traditional desktop mode has cost sales. While the Metro interface works well with the touchscreen, it seems that PC users using a keyboard and a mouse do not care for the Metro interface.

Corporate customers, as well, have skipped Windows 8 and have instead stuck with the traditional Windows 7 desktop interface because it simply works better with the business applications that companies use. In turn, this has caused companies to stick with Windows 7 and postpone refreshes of desktops and laptops. In addition, many companies are now experimenting with BYOD (bring your own device) and having users access Windows 7 via VDIs hosted by the companies.

It remains to be seen if offering a boot to desktop option to bypass the Metro interface will really do anything to help get the sales of Windows 8 going; but we suspect that it could not hurt the situation by offering it.

David Stellmack

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