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Friday, 17 May 2013 09:25

Innodisk rolls out registered DDR4 DIMM samples

Written by Nermin Hajdarbegovic



First stop, server market

Innodisk has announced that it managed to ship the first DDR4 DIMM samples to server companies for use in next generation systems. GDDR4 first appeared in graphics cards six years ago, but DDR4 development took a bit longer. DDR4 was not applied to servers, let alone consumer PCs, until now.

Innodisk says its modules can outpace any DDR3 solution, including the fastest modules out there. DDR4 memory bus speeds start at 2133MHz, which already offers a huge jump in potential performance from the average bus speed of 1333MHz and 1666MHz offered by DDR3.

What’s more, DDR4 devices run on significantly lower voltages than devices using DDR3 or DDR2 technology. JEDEC's specifications suggest that DDR4 will operate with a power envelope of 1.2 volts, compared to the 1.5 volts demanded by the more power-hungry DDR3 generation. Lower voltages help extend component lifespans and reduce power consumption.

DDR4 modules could potentially reduce power consumption by as much as 40 percent compared to DDR3 modules operating at 1.35V. In addition, the maximum capacity per chip has been doubled from 64GB to 128GB, which results in a smaller footprint, meaning cheaper and simpler module construction.

The first batch of Innodisk’s DDR4 modules will be available in capacities of 4GB, 8GB and 16GB.

Last modified on Friday, 17 May 2013 11:10
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