Featured Articles

AMD sheds light on stacked DRAM APUs

AMD sheds light on stacked DRAM APUs

AMD is fast tracking stacked DRAM deployment and a new presentation leaked by the company  points to APUs with stacked DRAM,…

More...
Nvidia officially launches the 8-inch Shield Tablet

Nvidia officially launches the 8-inch Shield Tablet

As expected and reported earlier, Nvidia has now officially announced its newest Shield device, the new 8-inch Shield Tablet. While the…

More...
Intel launches new mobile Haswell and Bay Trail parts

Intel launches new mobile Haswell and Bay Trail parts

Intel has introduced seven new Haswell mobile parts and four Bay Trail SoC chips, but most of them are merely clock…

More...
Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool is well known for its gamer cases with aggressive styling. However, the Dead Silence chassis offers consumers a new choice,…

More...
AMD A8-7600 Kaveri APU reviewed

AMD A8-7600 Kaveri APU reviewed

Today we'll take a closer look at AMD's A8-7600 APU Kaveri APU, more specifically we'll examine the GPU performance you can…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Wednesday, 22 May 2013 10:27

Fox was not hacked by the FBI

Written by Nick Farrell



Looks like it was made up

Claims by Fox News that its servers were hacked into by the FBI are proving about as accurate as one of its own election result broadcasts.

Fox News host Shepard Smith claimed that the FBI used a court order to look into the Gmail account of Stephen Kim, an official working at the State Department on arms control issues related to North Korea to poke around its servers. Smith claimed that the Justice Department snoop into the communications of Fox News reporter James Rosen.

The feds, as it turns out, were interested in reviewing correspondence on a Gmail account used by Rosen. But the an attachment to the document specifies “ITEMS TO BE SEIZED” and focuses on his Gmail account. Smith claimed that the FBI went into computer servers at Fox News, went around its security, pulled things out, and didn’t tell it they’d done so.

He was a little short on proof of this and William Miller, spokesman for the US Attorney’s Office for the District of Columbia said that the search warrant obtained from the court in this case was solely for a Gmail account, housed on Google’s servers, under an alias of the reporter that had previously been used to covertly communicate with Kim. The FBI did not search the computer servers of any news organisation or need to. Since Miller made this statement, Fox has been uncharacteristically quiet about any allegations of FBI hacking.

Nick Farrell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments