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Wednesday, 22 May 2013 10:27

Fox was not hacked by the FBI

Written by Nick Farrell



Looks like it was made up

Claims by Fox News that its servers were hacked into by the FBI are proving about as accurate as one of its own election result broadcasts.

Fox News host Shepard Smith claimed that the FBI used a court order to look into the Gmail account of Stephen Kim, an official working at the State Department on arms control issues related to North Korea to poke around its servers. Smith claimed that the Justice Department snoop into the communications of Fox News reporter James Rosen.

The feds, as it turns out, were interested in reviewing correspondence on a Gmail account used by Rosen. But the an attachment to the document specifies “ITEMS TO BE SEIZED” and focuses on his Gmail account. Smith claimed that the FBI went into computer servers at Fox News, went around its security, pulled things out, and didn’t tell it they’d done so.

He was a little short on proof of this and William Miller, spokesman for the US Attorney’s Office for the District of Columbia said that the search warrant obtained from the court in this case was solely for a Gmail account, housed on Google’s servers, under an alias of the reporter that had previously been used to covertly communicate with Kim. The FBI did not search the computer servers of any news organisation or need to. Since Miller made this statement, Fox has been uncharacteristically quiet about any allegations of FBI hacking.

Nick Farrell

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