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Thursday, 17 May 2007 01:55

Windows Home Server goes OEM

Written by test
Image

Good news all around?


Ever fancied building your own Windows Home Server? No? Well, neither have we, but according to a post on ArsTechnica, Microsoft is going to release Windows Home Server to OEM's.

Currently Windows Home Server has only been available to a select few partners, such as HP, but this announcement should open up the platform to any system integrated that was interested in making its own Windows Home Server appliance.

Windows Home Server is not too bad if you're just looking for a simple box that plugs in and works with your current Windows infrastructure and your Xbox 360, but if you're running a mixed OS network, you might be in for a few surprises along the road.

Considering how expensive these boxes are, you're generally better off getting an affordable NAS solution, although these are generally a little bit trickier to set up. The advantage of Windows Home Server is that you could in theory run it on an older PC to which you add a couple of hard drives, but that is if you can get hold of a version of the OS, which has been impossible until now.

You can read the full story over at ArsTechnica
Last modified on Thursday, 17 May 2007 01:55

test

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