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Tuesday, 27 August 2013 08:49

Intel wants people to overclock their SSDs

Written by Nick Farrell

What could go wrong

Chipzilla will demonstrate how to overclocking its SSD range.

Next month’s Intel Developer Forum in San Francisco in September will be the stage for the tech demo has been entitled “Overclocking Unlocked Intel Core Processors for High Performance Gaming and Content Creation”.  This is the first time that Chipzilla has mentioned that a public demonstration of overclocking Intel SSDs will occur.

Word on the street is that Intel is prepared to let users overclock the controller chip on their solid state drive.

Of course the whole thing is fairly risky. If you stuff up an overclock on and SSD you are going to lose a lot of data. It is possible that Intel has thought about this and has some sort of data loss prevention method in place. Or it could just warn you that it is really dangerous and you do it at your own risk.

Nick Farrell

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