Featured Articles

Analysts expect ARM to do well next year

Analysts expect ARM to do well next year

British chip designer ARM could cash in on the mobile industry's rush to transition to 64-bit operating systems and hardware.

More...
Huawei and Xiaomi outpace Lenovo, LG in smartphone market

Huawei and Xiaomi outpace Lenovo, LG in smartphone market

Samsung has lost smartphone market share, ending the quarter on a low note and Xiaomi appears to be the big winner.

More...
Intel Broadwell 15W coming to CES

Intel Broadwell 15W coming to CES

It looks like Intel will be showing off its 14nm processors, codenames Broadwell, in a couple of weeks at CES 2015.

More...
Gainward GTX 980 Phantom reviewed

Gainward GTX 980 Phantom reviewed

Today we’ll be taking a closer look at the recently introduced Gainward GTX 980 4GB with the company’s trademark Phantom cooler.

More...
Zotac ZBOX Sphere OI520 barebones vs Sphere Plus review

Zotac ZBOX Sphere OI520 barebones vs Sphere Plus review

Zotac has been in the nettop and mini-PC space for more than four years now and it has managed to carve…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Monday, 02 September 2013 10:20

Microsoft had Google standing up to Prism

Written by Nick Farrell

You probably were not expecting this

Microsoft and Google have walked out of talks with the Government after the NSA started to get even sillier over its Prism spying programme. Google and Vole wanted the government to allow them to disclose the now-secret data requests they receive and it seems that the government sees them as pro-terrorist, pro-communist, who are so unpatriotic they should probably also be investigated.

Microsoft's general counsel, Brad Smith, said that while he appreciated the good faith and earnest efforts by the capable government lawyers with whom Microsoft and Google negotiated, he was disappointed that these negotiations failed. The director of National Intelligence, James Clapper, promised to disclose aggregate numbers of FISA orders issued to tech and telecom companies, but will not allow the companies to make such disclosures. We guess this is because if the companies release the figures then they will be accurate and not picked out of the bottoms of spooks trying to re-assure the public that they are not really living in a totalitarian state.

"FISA and national security letters are an important part of our effort to keep the nation and its citizens safe, and disclosing more detailed information about how they are used and to whom they are directed can obviously help our enemies avoid detection," Clapper said in a statement.

The tech sector does not want to stop the spying just tell the great unwashed when and how they have been spied upon. They are also keen to shake off the concerns about their involvement in vast secret US surveillance programs revealed by former spy contractor Edward Snowden.

Nick Farrell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments