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Thursday, 24 October 2013 11:05

Internet connection available on moon

Written by Nick Farrell



622Mbps transfer speed

NASA has managed to get a decent broadband connection to the moon, not that there is anyone there to need it.

NASA engineers say they have managed to get a 622Mbps transfer speed to the moon using lasers—instead of radio waves—to transmit data between its ground station in New Mexico and a spacecraft that's orbiting the moon, 239,000 miles away. The agency was also able to upload error-free data to the LADEE (Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer) spacecraft at a rate of 20Mbps.

Things are moving on the interplanetary broadband front. Earlier this year NASA beam the Mona Lisa into space at a rather paltry 300 bits per second so a 622Mbps is definitely a step up. The new success of the LLCD marks a major milestone in space communications: NASA has previously relied on radio frequency data links, but they're not able to carry the quantities of data that the agency will require in the future.

When lunar internet is better than your home connections, it is probably a good idea to sing up for a colony. (Also, internet porn could make manned missions to Mars a reality. Ed)

Nick Farrell

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