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Monday, 25 November 2013 12:55

Facebook sues over sextape scam

Written by Nick Farrell



What is a Justin Bieber anyway

Social notworking site Facebook has sued a spammer who posted fake links which claimed to be to a sex tape of Justin Bieber and Selena Gomez. Apparently, there are people in the world who really want to see that, and not gouge out their eyes with spoons.

The court documents claim that Christopher Peter Tarquini was behind the faked Facebook messages. Those who clicked the link in the posts were redirected to sites that allegedly paid Mr Tarquini for hits. To make matters worse, clicking led to the posts being automatically shared with users' Facebook friends. This is why we know who really wanted to see Bieber and Gomez bonk. 

Facebook dubbed Tarquini, of New Jersey, a "recidivist" spammer who has spent much of the past five years crafting computer programmes that put "deceptive messages, images and links" on the site's pages. Tarquini persisted in targeting the social network even after he was told that his actions violated Facebook's terms. 

Facebook said it had a confession from Tarquini that he had written the program that took over accounts and posted faked links. Tarquini has yet to file any legal response to Facebook's claims.

Nick Farrell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
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