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Monday, 13 January 2014 12:08

Hackers want to control your fridge

Written by Nick Farrell



If there is nothing better on the telly

The Consumer Electronics Show was full of examples of connecting appliances to the internet and now security outfits are warning that they could be easy to hack.

Dubbed the Internet of things, it could be the next big thing for consumer gadgets. But Kevin Haley, director of Symantec Security Response warned that while the technology was impressive "they're all breachable." He said that if an object is connected to the Internet, you will find it, and if it has an operating system, a hacker can turn it over. What worries him is that he pace of innovation could outstrip the security protecting the devices.

Users are going to have to take some responsibility if they start bringing this stuff into their houses. The devices displayed the CES show included an array of gear from a connected basketball to baby clothing which monitors an infant's breathing and positioning.

However other experts were trying to play down the threat, claiming that it was mostly theoretical for now.

Nick Farrell

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