Featured Articles

LG G Watch R ships in two weeks

LG G Watch R ships in two weeks

The LG G Watch R, the first Android Wear watch with a truly round face, is coming soon and judging by…

More...
LG unveils NUCLUN big.LITTLE SoC

LG unveils NUCLUN big.LITTLE SoC

LG has officially announced its first smartphone SoC, the NUCLUN, formerly known as the Odin.

More...
Microsoft moves 2.4 million Xbox Ones

Microsoft moves 2.4 million Xbox Ones

Microsoft has announced that it move 2.4 million consoles in fiscal year 2015 Q1. The announcement came with the latest financial…

More...
Gainward GTX 970 Phantom previewed

Gainward GTX 970 Phantom previewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
EVGA GTX 970 SC ACX 2.0 reviewed

EVGA GTX 970 SC ACX 2.0 reviewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Wednesday, 29 January 2014 12:23

UK might dump Microsoft

Written by Nick Farrell



Wants something more open saucy

UK Cabinet Office minister Francis Maude plans to standardise on open formats in a move which should scare the beejesus out of proprietary outfits like Microsoft. Maude said that the UK government can save tens of millions of pounds by not using products like Microsoft Office.

Some £200m has been spent by the public sector on the computer giant's Office suite alone since 2010. But the Cabinet Office minister believes a significant proportion of that outlay could be cut by switching to free "open-source" software, such as OpenOffice, or Google Docs. This would break the "oligopoly" of IT suppliers, and improve communications between civil servants.

Speaking at a cross-government event showcasing new online services Maude said that the software used in government is still supplied by just a few large companies and a tiny oligopoly dominates the marketplace.

"I want to see a greater range of software used, so civil servants have access to the information they need and can get their work done without having to buy a particular brand of software," he said. "In the first instance, this will help departments to do something as simple as share documents with each other more easily. But it will also make it easier for the public to use and share government information."

Nick Farrell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments