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Wednesday, 26 February 2014 21:40

Mobile gaming to take advantage of 64-bit push

Written by Fuad Abazovic

 

So believe Intel and Qualcomm

It looks like Intel and Qualcomm are in agreement on at least one thing when it comes to mobile. Intel is saying that mobile gaming might be the biggest benefiter of the 64-bit upgrade and so does Qualcomm.

Both companies saying that gaming applications should benefit from the move to 64-bit, but in all honesty we haven’t seen that happen in the PC world. Even today, more than a decade since our PCs got introduced to 64-bit computing, processors and operating system capable of running and addressing 64-bit, we don’t see that the 64-bit Desktop or notebooks are much faster in gaming. It used to be quite opposite even years after 64-bit chips launched, due to some teething problems. Drivers were one of the key difficulties. We expect to live to the same scenario unfold in mobile, as it has happened before.

The mobile industry will have to convince game developers to start optimizing for 64-bit Android and alternatives. This means additional investment to already costly process that has to come from somewhere.

We will see some performance increase in games, possibly some benchmarks at the beginning and until phones and tablets start shipping with 4GB of memory or more, they won’t really gain much from a 64-bit OS, but it looks like 64-bit support will be more or less standard from late 2014 onwards. It will be there, and so will 64-bit SoCs.

 

Last modified on Thursday, 27 February 2014 08:37
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