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Tuesday, 17 June 2014 10:48

VMWare slags off Amazon's cloud calculator

Written by Nick Farrell

Biased and inaccurate

VMware has waded into to Amazon's new total cost of ownership calculator saying that it uses "biased and inaccurate assumptions" when comparing the cost of VMware's software with Amazon's. 

VMware which competes with Amazon's AWS cloud via its own recently-launched vCloud Hybrid Service (vCHS) tech, released a blog post slamming the online book seller for how it portrayed VMware's pricing. Amazon made changes to its cloud cost calculator to take account of VMware environments in May, and followed that up with an AWS plugin for VMware vCenter that made it easy for admins to put workloads onto Amazon’s cloud.

Needless to say VMware is calling a foul. Writing in its blog, VMWare wrote that Amazon claimed its calculator provides an 'apples-to-apples' comparison but did not come close. 

“Their calculator contains biased assumptions regarding VMware's TCO, which inflate the costs of an on-premises cloud and underestimate the true costs of using a public cloud solution," Vmware wrote.

Amazon's calculator thinks that a customer has no existing on-premises investment, chooses rather high server prices, and assumes that all IT shops are refreshing their hardware every three years, VMware said.

It also compares VMware's feature-packed "VMware vSphere Enterprise Plus" software against its infrastructure, which VMware feels is unfair as the tech has some features that Amazon lacks, so the cost comparison is not accurate.

Nick Farrell

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