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Thursday, 26 June 2014 12:38

4K telly finally gets a use

Written by Nick Farrell



Ultra HD transmission by the BBC

The BBC is to follow up its World Cup in 4K broadcast trials with further tests of Ultra HD transmission. This time the technology will get a public use during the Commonwealth Games in Glasgow.

The World Cup in 4K is being restricted to the Beeb's own R&D facilities. However, the trials during the Commonwealth Games will be shown as part of a public showcase in the Glasgow Science Centre. It is still a long way off before any 4K broadcasts will be made to the great unwashed.

The footage will be entirely delivered over the internet, utilising early versions of BBC R&D's streaming technologies. Eventually, it is hoped that the Commonwealth Games trial combined with the ones taking place during the World Cup will benefit not just the potential for home 4K broadcasting in future, but to establish a new broadcasting system delivered entirely over Internet Protocol (IP) networks, making live coverage more efficient and interactive.

The idea is to help producers create programmes more efficiently and cost-effectively, but it allows them to take advantage of data like never before.

Nick Farrell

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