Featured Articles

Analysts expect ARM to do well next year

Analysts expect ARM to do well next year

British chip designer ARM could cash in on the mobile industry's rush to transition to 64-bit operating systems and hardware.

More...
Huawei and Xiaomi outpace Lenovo, LG in smartphone market

Huawei and Xiaomi outpace Lenovo, LG in smartphone market

Samsung has lost smartphone market share, ending the quarter on a low note and Xiaomi appears to be the big winner.

More...
Intel Broadwell 15W coming to CES

Intel Broadwell 15W coming to CES

It looks like Intel will be showing off its 14nm processors, codenames Broadwell, in a couple of weeks at CES 2015.

More...
Gainward GTX 980 Phantom reviewed

Gainward GTX 980 Phantom reviewed

Today we’ll be taking a closer look at the recently introduced Gainward GTX 980 4GB with the company’s trademark Phantom cooler.

More...
Zotac ZBOX Sphere OI520 barebones vs Sphere Plus review

Zotac ZBOX Sphere OI520 barebones vs Sphere Plus review

Zotac has been in the nettop and mini-PC space for more than four years now and it has managed to carve…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Wednesday, 23 July 2014 10:24

Zuckerburg to appear in court

Written by Nick Farrell



Sadly as a witness

Facebook founder Mark Zuckerburg is going to have a day in court, as a potential victim of what would have been the most stupid con trick in the history of scamming. Paul Ceglia is on trial for pretending that Zuckerburg signed a contract with him to give him half of his stake of Facebook if the idea took off. Ceglia broke one of the rules of such a swindle by making it extremely public and attempting to get lawyers involved.

In 2010, Ceglia sued against Zuckerberg and Facebook in Buffalo, New York, claiming the two men signed a contract when Zuckerberg was a freshman at Harvard University that gave Ceglia half of a planned social networking website. It was possible, as Zuckerberg had previously done some programing work for Ceglia’s company, StreetFax.com. However when coppers had a look at the contract and emails between the two men, which should have been expected in a high-profile case, they discovered that it appeared to have been forged. 

In March, a Buffalo federal judge dismissed Ceglia's lawsuit, finding the purported contract for an ownership stake in Facebook was doctored.

Ceglia is going out fighting. His lawyers to authorize warrants for Zuckerberg’s mobile phones, email accounts and bank records at Facebook from 2003 to 2004. A judge said that was a little broad and told them no. He also told them that they could not did up some personal dirt on Zuckerberg by seeing his Harvard email account and any possible disciplinary records against him for unauthorised use of the school’s computer system.

Nick Farrell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments