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Wednesday, 30 July 2014 12:33

A telly sandwich will create Hi-Res

Written by Nick Farrell



Nvidia wants to stick two TV’s together

Boffins at Nvidia have come up with an interesting idea to improve television resolution – stick two screens on top of one another. The theory is that by making an LCD sandwich you can increase the pixel density of a video display and quadruple the resolution.

Dubbed 'cascaded displays', the new technique is anticipated to pave the way for the development of cheap, ultra-high-resolution screens intended for consumer-oriented head-mounted displays such as the Oculus Rift. Apparently, Nvidia has developed a prototype cascaded display device using a 3D printer, which looks similar to the Oculus Rift.

What Nvidia does is take LCD panels from their casings, and the backlight removed from one of them. A quarter-wave film is placed between the two panels, and the two panels are positioned with a slight offset, signifying that each pixel on the front display will in fact act as a 'shutter' for four pixels on the rear panel.

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