Error
  • JUser::_load: Unable to load user with id: 67

Featured Articles

AMD sheds light on stacked DRAM APUs

AMD sheds light on stacked DRAM APUs

AMD is fast tracking stacked DRAM deployment and a new presentation leaked by the company  points to APUs with stacked DRAM,…

More...
Nvidia officially launches the 8-inch Shield Tablet

Nvidia officially launches the 8-inch Shield Tablet

As expected and reported earlier, Nvidia has now officially announced its newest Shield device, the new 8-inch Shield Tablet. While the…

More...
Intel launches new mobile Haswell and Bay Trail parts

Intel launches new mobile Haswell and Bay Trail parts

Intel has introduced seven new Haswell mobile parts and four Bay Trail SoC chips, but most of them are merely clock…

More...
Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool is well known for its gamer cases with aggressive styling. However, the Dead Silence chassis offers consumers a new choice,…

More...
AMD A8-7600 Kaveri APU reviewed

AMD A8-7600 Kaveri APU reviewed

Today we'll take a closer look at AMD's A8-7600 APU Kaveri APU, more specifically we'll examine the GPU performance you can…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Wednesday, 25 July 2007 12:15

BIND hacked

Written by

Image

People can be forced to fraud sites


Security company Trusteer claims that its CTO and security researcher Amit Klein has cracked BIND's random number generator. The hack will enable "DNS Forgery Pharming" in which fraudsters can remotely force consumers to visit fraudulent websites without compromising any computer or network device.

The attack is possible because of the way BIND avoids a DNS response forgery. To stop a fraudster sending a spoofed response with a bogus IP address to the requesting computer, BIND implements a standard DNS security mechanism, based on a randomly-generated number.

The idea is that fraudsters who do not control the route between the user and the DNS server from forging DNS responses and directing the user to the wrong server.

However Klein, has discovered a severe flaw in BIND's implementation which allows fraudsters to efficiently predict the random numbers. Fraudsters can remotely forge DNS responses and direct users to fraudulent websites.

A patch has been developed by ISC against the flaw for those who manage a BIND 9 DNS server.

More here.

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments