Featured Articles

Analysts expect ARM to do well next year

Analysts expect ARM to do well next year

British chip designer ARM could cash in on the mobile industry's rush to transition to 64-bit operating systems and hardware.

More...
Huawei and Xiaomi outpace Lenovo, LG in smartphone market

Huawei and Xiaomi outpace Lenovo, LG in smartphone market

Samsung has lost smartphone market share, ending the quarter on a low note and Xiaomi appears to be the big winner.

More...
Intel Broadwell 15W coming to CES

Intel Broadwell 15W coming to CES

It looks like Intel will be showing off its 14nm processors, codenames Broadwell, in a couple of weeks at CES 2015.

More...
Gainward GTX 980 Phantom reviewed

Gainward GTX 980 Phantom reviewed

Today we’ll be taking a closer look at the recently introduced Gainward GTX 980 4GB with the company’s trademark Phantom cooler.

More...
Zotac ZBOX Sphere OI520 barebones vs Sphere Plus review

Zotac ZBOX Sphere OI520 barebones vs Sphere Plus review

Zotac has been in the nettop and mini-PC space for more than four years now and it has managed to carve…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Friday, 10 August 2007 07:56

Pirated blank DVD M-Codes face potential crackdown

Written by David Stellmack
Image

M-Code identification piracy big business

TDK, Imation and Verbatim are in the process of requesting that Japanese authorities take action to stem the tide of imported black DVD writable media that contains pirated M-Codes. M-Codes are the identification that is encoded into writable optical media that tells the writer how to configure itself for use with the black disc.

The majority of the discs that are using M-Codes that don’t belong to them appear to be coming from a variety of second tier sources. The M-Codes are the property of the company that owns them and it is only supposed to be used on blank media that it has been tested and assigned to. While some companies license the use of their M-Code, this is only to be done under the watchful eye of the M-Code owner.

The need for higher quality media that meets a higher standard is necessary with the high speed optical writers and often times many discs that are produced using pirated M-Codes are of a lesser quality, which can present problems for the end user. Media from second tier sources is often times much cheaper because these vendors are not paying the proper royalties to the correct parties. Oftentimes media with pirated M-Codes is sold in countries that do not have laws that govern M-Code piracy.

When it comes to optical media, you get what you pay for. The track record on low priced budget media normally comes from second tier sources who are selling B and C grade media that is not made the highest standard. For the best performance and the fewest problems, it is best to purchase branded media from a trusted source.

Read more here...

Last modified on Friday, 10 August 2007 09:44

David Stellmack

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments